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Possible Melted Fuel Seen for First Time at Fukushima Plant

Possible Melted Fuel Seen for First Time at Fukushima Plant

By Mari Yamaguchi | Jul 23
An underwater robot captured images of lava-like lumps Thursday inside a damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, spotting for the first time what is believed to be nuclear fuel that melted six years ago.

Afghan Team Among Medal Winners at Global Robotics Event

Afghan Team Among Medal Winners at Global Robotics Event

By Jessica Gresko | Jul 20
The team that drew the most attention at the FIRST Global Challenge, which ended Tuesday, was a squad of girls from Afghanistan who were twice rejected for U.S. visas before President Donald Trump intervened.

Re-Creating Old Weapons for New Discoveries of Human History

Re-Creating Old Weapons for New Discoveries of Human History

By Dake Kang | Jul 16
Metin Eren wasn't satisfied just digging up ancient arrowheads to learn about the past. He wanted to use them for their intended purpose.

'Extremely Unique:' Lion Nurses Leopard Cub in Tanzania

'Extremely Unique:' Lion Nurses Leopard Cub in Tanzania

By Christopher Torchia | Jul 16
Newly released photographs from a Tanzanian wildlife area show an incredibly rare sight: A leopard cub suckling on a lion believed to have given birth to a litter last month.

Missile Wars: Where North Korea Stands After ICBM Launch

Missile Wars: Where North Korea Stands After ICBM Launch

By Eric Talmadge | Jul 14
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is on the cusp of having something his father and grandfather could only dream of - the ability to unleash a nuclear attack on the United States.

Afghan Girls Robotics Team Arrives in Kabul

Afghan Girls Robotics Team Arrives in Kabul

Jul 13
After their visas were twice denied, the Afghan all-girls robotics team is now allowed entry into the U.S.; AP tracks their progress.

Scientists Say Massive Iceberg Has Broken Off in Antarctica

Scientists Say Massive Iceberg Has Broken Off in Antarctica

Jul 12
A vast iceberg with twice the volume of Lake Erie has broken off from a key floating ice shelf in Antarctica, scientists said Wednesday.

FDA Approves First New Drug in 20 Years for Sickle Cell

FDA Approves First New Drug in 20 Years for Sickle Cell

Jul 10
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug in nearly 20 years for sickle cell, an inherited disease in which abnormally shaped red blood cells can't properly carry oxygen throughout the body.

CT Scans Find Possible Tunnel in Mexico's Teotihuacan Ruins

CT Scans Find Possible Tunnel in Mexico's Teotihuacan Ruins

Jul 7
Archaeologists at Mexico's Teotihuacan ruins have found evidence that the city's builders dug a tunnel beneath the Pyramid of the Moon and researchers said one of its purposes may have been to emulate the underworld.

China Rocket Failure Likely to Set Back Next Space Missions

China Rocket Failure Likely to Set Back Next Space Missions

By Christopher Bodeen | Jul 6
The failure of China's Long March 5 rocket deals a rare setback to China's highly successful space program that could delay plans to bring back moon samples and offer rival India a chance to move ahead in the space rankings.

Forecasters Say Budget Cuts Could Hurt Hurricane Predictions

Forecasters Say Budget Cuts Could Hurt Hurricane Predictions

By Jennifer Kay | Jul 3
Recent progress in forecasting the intensity of hurricanes - which has lagged behind storm track forecasting - could be undermined by proposed cuts in federal funding for tropical weather research, says the retiring chief of a team of U.S. hurricane speci

SpaceX Launches 10 Satellites from California Air Base

SpaceX Launches 10 Satellites from California Air Base

By John Antczak and Christopher Weber | Jun 28
A SpaceX rocket carried 10 communications satellites into orbit from California on Sunday, two days after the company successfully launched a satellite from Florida.

Cyprus Uses High-Tech Tools to Speed Search for Its Missing

Cyprus Uses High-Tech Tools to Speed Search for Its Missing

By Menelas Hadjicostis | Jun 26
With glue gun in hand, Turkish Cypriot anthropologist Sinem Hossoz meticulously pieces together tiny fragments - the pulverized skull of a child, one of the youngest victims of conflict on ethnically divided Cyprus.

Experts: U.S. Exiting Climate Pact May Doom Some Small Islands

Experts: U.S. Exiting Climate Pact May Doom Some Small Islands

By Seth Borenstein and Nick Perry | Jun 26
To small island nations where the land juts just above the rising seas, the U.S. pulling out of the Paris global warming pact makes the future seem as fragile and built on hope as a sand castle.

'Human Project' Study Will Ask 10,000 to Share Life's Data

'Human Project' Study Will Ask 10,000 to Share Life's Data

By Jennifer Peltz | Jun 22
Wanted: 10,000 New Yorkers interested in advancing science by sharing a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. For 20 years.

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